Thursday 13.10.16

Posted by: Oliver Callund

Close
Stuff we like

EASY - A LIGHT-TOUCH EXAMINATION OF LIFE'S MANY VARIED RELATIONSHIPS

Hello Roguettes,

I watch a lot of TV... Like a lot, a lot.  By which I mean I stream a lot of television shows since I can probably count in one hand the times I have actually sat in front of my (housemate's) TV and watched regularly programmed material in the past year. So when the cold season finally caught up to me this last weekend and I was shackled to my bed I scrolled through Netflix to find the next series to devour. I must admit I have substantially depleted Netflix's repertoire here in the UK, so finding something I hadn't watched was proving to be a struggle. That's when I stumbled upon "Easy" - a new Netflix original series I hadn't heard anything about. I decided to dive in and was very pleasantly surprised.

Easy is an 8 episode anthology, each lasting between 25-35 minutes and taking place in Chicago, that explores life's various relationships. Be it the jitters of a blossoming couple, the dynamics of two brothers trying to start a business together, or the naive joy of a married couple exploring dating apps to spice things up after having a baby.  Joe Swamberg's light touch direction, foregoing scripts and giving the actors detailed outlines of what he wants to occur and allowing them string the plot points through improv,  gives the entire series a beautifully natural and realistic feel that truly allows the actors to shine.

That being said, Swamberg's directional style is a double edged sword with some episodes clearly shine brighter than others depending on the actor's ability to improv and truly embody their character.

Here's a trailer for the series:

One of my favourite episodes has to be "Controlada", partly because most of the episode is in Spanish, but mostly because the main character's journey is tough to watch, yet relatable, and her arc culminates in a masterfully crafted physical encounter that could easily be misinterpreted if it wasn't so carefully choreographed by Swamberg.

With a truly amazing and varied cast, some exemplary performances, and the added bonus of detailedly exploring the beauty of the Windy City, I truly urge you to snuggle up in a blanket and give this little gem a chance.

Till next time,

Oliver